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MEBH4M1_Sanitised (Text)

Item metadata
Speaker:
primary,male,16
ns1:CODE
BH4M.1
ns1:FathersEthnicity
British (Northern England)
ns1:INTERVIEWERifrelevant
JC (RF3)
ns1:LanguagesSpokenathome
English
ns1:MaternalGrandfathersEthnicity
British (Northern England)
ns1:MaternalGrandmothersEthnicity
British (Northern England)
ns1:MothersEthnicity
British (Northern England)
ns1:PaternalGrandfathersEthnicity
British (Northern England)
ns1:PaternalGrandmothersEthnicity
British (Northern England)
ns1:STUDENTSINITIALS
PS
ns1:TRANSCRIBER
SE
Audience :
Small Group
Communication Context :
Face to Face
Related Document :
MEBH4M1_Sanitised (Text), Text http://ns.ausnc.org.au/corpora/monash/source/MEBH4M1_Sanitised#Raw http://ns.ausnc.org.au/corpora/monash/source/MEBH4M1_Sanitised#Original http://ns.ausnc.org.au/corpora/monash/source/MEBH4M1_Sanitised#Audio
Interactivity :
Dialogue
Word Count :
2452
Mode :
Spoken
ns1:notes
This informant was born in England (Manchester) and came to Australia when he was three years old. He returned to Manchester when he was seven, and again when he was eleven (doesn’t mention the length of time, but says that he ‘lived in Manchester’). All the members of his immediate family were born in England. He says that his mother still retains her Manchester accent, and also speaks French fluently, as she lived in France for a year when she was eighteen and is still actively developing her skills in the language.
Speech Style :
Spontaneous
ns1:transcription_notes
[u'']
Identifier
MEBH4M1_Sanitised
part of:
Discourse Type :
Interactive Discourse
Document metadata
Extent:
12882
Identifier
MEBH4M1_Sanitised-plain.txt
Title
MEBH4M1_Sanitised#Text
Type
Text

MEBH4M1_Sanitised-plain.txt — 12 KB

File contents

Okay REDACTED.  Where do you live?
Um REDACTED.
REDACTED?  So how do you get to school
         everyday?
I um catch the bus or I get a lift down with my mum onto the bus stop
         and then catch the bus through REDACTED.
Right.  Do you like catching the bus?
Yeah, it’s good, I get to be with my friends.  And wrestle together
         on the bus.
Oh do you?  Do your friends have a particular part of the bus that
         you like to sit in?
Yeah um the back of the bus.
It’s always the most popular spot isn’t it?
That’s right.  The back seat.
Why is that?
Oh mate feel tough I suppose.
Right, okay.  And do you like school?
Yeah, it’s all right.  School’s pretty good, IDENTIFYING MATERIAL
         REMOVED.  I like it.
What sort of subjects do you do?
Oh maths is my main subject like my sister.  She goes to Monash.
Okay.  Okay, tell me a bit about your sister.  Do you have any other
         siblings besides -
Yeah, I’ve got an older brother and um my sister does um behavioural
         science at Clayton and my brother’s an apprentice at IDENTIFYING
         MATERIAL REMOVED it’s an electricians and that and he enjoys that
         a lot.
So how old are they?
My sister’s 19 and my brother’s 21.
So you’re the youngest?
Yeah.
Do you like being the youngest?
Yeah, it’s good.  You get like spoilt a bit.
Do you?
Oh a bit, not much anymore.
Do you get along well with them?
Yeah, really really really well.
So you rarely have arguments.
Very rarely.
If you do have an argument what’s it generally about?
Yeah, not much just like we oh not much really.
And what about your parents, do you have a good relationship with
         them?
Yeah Really good, I get along really well with my mum and dad,
         especially my mum.
Oh good.  Do you think that people in your parent’s generation
         understand people in your generation?
Yeah, yeah pretty well.
In your case they do.
Yeah they understand like my hobbies and stuff like that.
Do you have any um hobbies that you’d like to tell me about?
Oh I play cricket.  That’s the love of my life.
Right.
Barring none.  Yeah, I really love cricket.
And you enjoy watching it on television do you?
Yeah I wouldn’t miss a second of it.  I’m going to get um a special
         antenna so you get the country channel.  It’s because um channel 9
         only gets you like the half of it but the country channel gets the
         whole.  So I’m going to get that pretty soon.
Right.  And do you ever get to the MCG?
Yeah, it’s really easy because the train drops you right outside it.
         It’s really good.  You just catch it on the IDENTIFYING MATERIAL
         REMOVED line train.
So do you like the test matches better than the one dayers?
Oh I love them both.  Equally.
Do you?  And you play a bit of cricket.
Yeah, I play it a lot myself.
And who do you like to see Australia play?
Oh the West Indies.  I don’t go for Australia.
You don’t?  Who do you follow?
The West Indies.
The West Indies? Right.  How long have you been following them?
When they came out in 1990 -1991.  From then.
Who’s your favourite player?
Probably um Brian Lara.
Why is that?
Because he’s just very exciting and makes a lot of runs.  And he’s
         left handed.  I’m left handed.
Are you?
Yeah, and he’s a very good batsman.
Are you a good batsman?
Yeah, I’d like to say so.
What about bowling?
Yeah oh I wicket-keep.
Oh okay.
Yeah that’s good, really good, wicket keeping.
Well that’s obviously your main hobby.  Do you have any other
         hobbies?
Um not really.  I used to play guitar but so that was good.  And I
         play tennis for um like the McDonald’s squad and the Shell squad
         for Victoria and that.  And then I play football as well.  So I
         play a fair few sports but nothing like compared to cricket.  I
         love that the most.
So would you like to sort of go overseas?
Yeah yeah.  I might be going to England soon, to play cricket.
         That’d be great.
That’s really good.
Yeah.
Have you travelled overseas before?
Yeah, I was born in England so -
Oh I see.
I’ve gone back a couple of times.  Really good.  Lived in um
         Manchester.
Right.
England. I was born in a place called Crewe which is near Manchester,
         or around it or whatever and um it’s really good.
How old were you when you came to Australia?
How - when I came here I was three, I went back when I was 7 and I
         went back when I was 11.  So I’ve gone back a couple of times.
So your parents both come from Manchester?
Yeah yeah both come from Manchester.  Every one in my family were
         born in England.
Right.  And you have other relatives over there I suppose?
Yeah yeah, most of mine I’ve got some cousins in Sydney, some cousins
         in REDACTED and um the rest are in England.
Right.
So we’ve got a couple over here which is all right.
Right.  Good.  And do you see much of the ones -
Yeah the ones in REDACTED, we don’t get along
         with that well um but we see them say twice a year and the ones in
         Sydney it’s harder because they’re in Sydney but we like to see
         them once or twice a year say at Christmas and Easter, we go up
         there.  Last time we met halfway in Bright.
Right.
So that was like halfway only for two or three days and that was
         really really good.  Weather was good.
Do you like hot weather?
Yeah, it’s been a bit hot the last couple of days, 40 but I don’t
         mind it, yeah.
What sort of things did you do over Summer?
Um, I just played cricket most of the time but when I wasn’t playing
         cricket I went to the tennis a couple of times with my brother.
Did you enjoy that?
Yeah, really enjoyed it.  I got a lift in with my brother, it was
         really good.  I’m actually doing work experience with my brother.
Oh I see.
At his apprenticeship place so that should be really good. --
When is your work experience?
Um, I think it’s in April.  Or April 11th - April eight to eleven it
         is.
Right.
And um yeah, so like I don’t see him all that much anymore
         because he leaves at say seven thirty in the morning, I don’t get
         up till quarter to eight, and he gets back at five or so, so I
         don’t see him that much.  But then on the weekends he’s out,
         obviously, so I haven’t seen him that much these four days or
         whenever it is should be good.
So you’d be travelling in with him, I guess?
Yeah, I get a lift with him in the morning and um it’s from eight-
         thirty in the morning til four-thirty - not bad, should be good.
         Should really enjoy it.  I don’t want to be an electrician but -
What do you want to be?
Um if I don’t play cricket for Australia ah I wouldn’t mind oh I
         don’t know I wouldn’t mind being something oh maybe an accountant
         or something along the lines of that.  Something like that.
Right.  So you’d settle for playing cricket for Australia?
Laugh
What about England?
If I play for any team I’d play for Australia.
Yeah.
Oh I want to visit the West Indies, so hopefully if I play for
         Australia I’d get a free trip that way.
Okay, do you um play cricket with your friends?
Yeah, I play cricket with my friends all the time, they get a bit
         sick of it but I don’t yeah.
Do you have one best friend or several best friends
No yeah I have a few, a few best friends over the years.
Yeah and what sort of things do you do together?
Um oh we just like go to the movies and play cricket and um yeah like
         the latest thing we did that we were never allowed to before but
         now we go to the city in the holidays and um see like maybe see a
         movie at the Jam Factory or something.
Yeah, that’s good.  What was the last movie you saw?
Um Ransom.  So it was a while ago.
Did you enjoy that?
Yeah it was quite good.
Who was in that? Mel Gibson
Mel Gibson yeah, and Rene Russo.
Yeah that’s right, and I think the boy was played or -
I don’t know who he was.
Oh he was somebody famous their son.  Nick Nolte’s son.
Was it?
Yeah.
Oh.
Yeah.  What about television?  Do you watch much television?
Yeah, I watch a bit of television.
Your favourite show?
Well the cricket, but um yeah probably Seinfeld or Simpsons oh there
         was a show on a few years ago and it was called Let the Blood Run
         Free, oh loved that.  It was on about seven years ago, and I’ve
         actually wrote a letter, I’m going to write into Channel 10 saying
         you know -
Bring it back.
Oh yeah, definitely.  Even if it’s like an unsociable hour, like one
         o’clock in the morning.
I guess you could tape it.
Yeah, I would yeah, tape it.
Do you use a computer much?
Yeah I really, I use it like every day.  I’ve got a 486.
And are you hooked onto the Internet?
No, I we’re going to be soon.  I’ve been bugging Dad for ages.
Right.  What about school?  Do you have facilities at school?
yeah we’ve got computers, oh I don’t know yeah I think we do have
         the internet but
Yeah.
A bit different, well it might --.
Well it’s very time consuming isn’t it?  Once you get into --
Load a few games, well we’ve got a colour printer and that so um I do
         all my front covers at school or I do my school typing out.
They look good.
Yeah, they look really good.  The presentation part of it.
I guess for your sister’s work she’d need it.
Yeah, she uses it all the time.  We always fight over who uses it -
         that’s one of the reasons why we fight, as you asked before, who
         uses the computer.
Yeah, just the normal family things.
Yeah.
Do you have a favourite food?
Um oh not really, I like all of them.  Just junk food.  Basically I
         like probably - ever heard of um a delicacy called Raffaelo?
Yes.  Chocolates.
That’s what I like, beautiful.
Yes, it is quite nice.  Do your parents speak any language other than
         English?
No.  I did Japanese for three years.
You did?
But I didn’t have the best of teachers for two of those years.
Right.
So and in Year 7 you only do it for half a year.
I see.
But then 8 and 9 you do it for a full year.
And do your parents still retain some of their Manchester accent?
Oh yeah my Mum does.  Sorry, my mum speaks French fluently.
Oh does she?
Yeah.  Sorry.
She learnt that at school?
No, she actually um lived in France like at 18 or whatever um and was
         there for about a year and learnt the language and she still learns
         it.
Right, that’s good.  Have you ever had any interest in learning a
         language other than English?
Yeah, well I did Japanese oh in Year 7 I was really keen because I
         was doing so well, then we had this bad teacher in Year 8 and I
         thought I’d stick with her just for Year 9, just one more year if I
         got a good year I’d keep going, then we had probably a ten-times
         worse teacher, and that was it.
It’s a shame.
A real shame, my Mum said because I was you know quite good.  Oh she
         said I could have done it because I’ve got a really good memory
         that’s one of the main things, with my memory and um I remember
         things from like nine years ago.
Do you?
My friends -- so I could have done really well at Japanese.
That would help when you’re revising your tests and exams.
Yeah, that’s right.  My memory, yeah it’s really good.  I find things
         quite easy to remember.  I think, like, if I learn it I’m not
         likely to forget it.
Yeah.
Basically, but if I don’t learn it -
What about all the cricket statistics?
Yes, I know a lot of that.
Do you?
Yeah. From this season and the season before and that.  But I don’t
         really know them from a long time ago, because I was over in
         England till I was three and then came over.
But you wouldn’t remember that, would you?
Oh no because I was only 3, but I think I remember some things like
         from my old house like I haven’t been there for 8 or 9 nine  I just
         remember them, I don’t know how but -
Well what would you do if you won Tattslotto?
Um, like I probably donate because there was a survey and most people
         said if they won it they would say if they had a choice they
         wouldn’t win it, the people who’d won it.  So I probably wouldn’t
         win it if I had the choice, but if I did, just say I did, I’d
         probably keep a bit of it and probably donate some of it because it
         would be pretty handy at the moment I suppose.  Because what they
         do is they just splurge on themselves, then when the money’s gone
         you feel like you know can’t I have anymore?
Can’t live with it, can’t live without it.
That’s right.
Well, I think that’s enough.

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