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2-073 (Text)

Item metadata
Speaker:
author,male,Nicholson, Craven,un addressee
ns1:discourse_type
Newspaper Article
Word Count :
404
Plaint Text :
ns1:register
Public Written
ns1:texttype
Newspapers & Broadsides
ns1:localityName
http://dbpedia.org/resource/New_South_Wales
Created:
1832
Identifier
2-073
Source
Ingleton, 1988
pages
146
Document metadata
Extent:
2273
Identifier
2-073-plain.txt
Title
2-073#Text
Type
Text

2-073-plain.txt — 2 KB

File contents



DEPOSITION OF THE SOLE SURVIVOR FROM THE WHALING BARQUE OLDHAM.
On or about the 26th or 27th March, 1832, the barque OLDHAM, of London, - Skelton, Esquire, of London, owner, and Robert Johnstone, of Lavisham-lane, Blackheath, master, anchored in the harbour of Wallis's Island South Pacific Ocean, and found lying there the British ship HARRIET, of London, and the American whalers, Milo, of New Bedford, and the ALENCIA, of Edgar Town.
On or about the 3rd or 4th April, the native girl, who was living on board with the captain, ran away, and the next day he went on shore with an armed boat, and demanded her. The chiefs ordered her to be brought down to the beach and told him (the captain) they would kill her if he wished: at the same time the boat's crew were forcing the women into the boat against their consent.
About this time three men, who had deserted from the British ship CORSAIR, entered on board the OLDHAM, leaving their clothes in the bush. On going on shore for them, some days afterwards, they discovered that some of them had been stolen; they returned on board, and stated this to the captain, who sent two boats to search the native huts for them. They returned bringing some clothes and a quantity of beads, tappa mats, fish-hooks &c, which they had plundered. Some of the old mats and tappas were returned.
The three vessels before mentioned sailed, leaving us alone in the harbour. On or about the 11th April, several natives came on board; the captain being in a state of intoxication, took two of them into the cabin, showed them muskets and other arms, and told then it was his intention to go on shore the next day and kill the king, desiring a negro man, named Ruebins, who lived on shore, to tell them so. The moment they understood this, a native went out to the jibboom end, and hailed the natives on shore. Two canoes immediately came off.
One of our men, who was on the main-chain, saw them (the natives) handling cutlasses and axes out of the canoes. He informed the captain of it, who immediately ordered them out of the ship. They obeyed, and said they would return next day with cocoa-nuts: they accordingly came at daylight, and gave away their cocoa-nuts, without asking for payment.
At breakfast time, the waist-boat 

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