Australian Access Federation

You are here: Home Corpora Corpus of Oz Early English 1-199 (Text)

1-199 (Text)

Item metadata
Speaker:
addressee author,male,Macarthur, John,55
ns1:discourse_type
Oratory
Word Count :
366
Plaint Text :
ns1:register
Speech Based
ns1:texttype
Minutes
ns1:localityName
http://dbpedia.org/resource/New_South_Wales
Created:
1822
Identifier
1-199
Source
Clark, 1977
pages
267
Document metadata
Extent:
2004
Identifier
1-199-plain.txt
Title
1-199#Text
Type
Text

1-199-plain.txt — 1 KB

File contents



In the year 1794, I purchased from an officer Sixty Bengal Ewes and Lambs, which had been imported from Calcutta and very soon after I procured from the Captain of a Transport from Ireland, two Irish Ewes and a young Ram. The Indian Sheep produced coarse hair and the wool of the Irish Sheep was then valued at no more than 9d. per lb. By crossing the two Breeds I had the satisfaction to see the lambs of the Indian Ewes bear the mingled fleece of hair and wool - this circumstance originated the idea of producing fine wool in New South Wales. In the year 1796 (I believe) the two sloops of war on this station were sent to the Cape of Good Hope, and as their Commanders were friends of mine, I requested them to enquire if there were any wool-bearing sheep at the Cape. At the period of their arrival at the Settlement there was a flock of Merino Sheep for sale, from which about twenty were purchased. Of these I was favoured with Four Ewes and Two Rams, the remainder were distributed amongst different individuals who did not take the necessary precautions to preserve the breed pure and they soon disappeared - Mine were carefully guarded against an impure mixture, and increased in number and improved in the quality of their wool. In a year or two after I had an opportunity of augmenting my flock by the purchase from Colonel Foveaux of 1200 Sheep of the common Cape Breed. In 1801 I took to England specimens of the pure Merino Wool, and of the best of the crossbred, and having submitted them to the inspection of a Committee of Manufacturers, they reported the Merino Wool was equal to any Spanish wool and the Crossbred of considerable value. Thus encouraged I purchased Nine Rams and a Ewe from the Royal Flock at Kew, and returned to this country determined to devote my attention to the improvement of the Wool of my flocks. I only landed here Five Rams and one Ewe of the Sheep purchased from the Royal Flock. It is from these sources alone that my present stock has been raised.

http://ns.ausnc.org.au/corpora/cooee/source/1-199#Text